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of $10,000. we are looking at pay according to a cato institute that puts the average pay of a government worker at $84,000 per year. that's 32,000 more dollars than the average pay in the private sector. i mean, these numbers are starting to be overwhelming and certainly have to be part of what is, if you will, and more positive response to these right to work issues and votes that we are seeing across the country. >> i think that's right. and it steves group, the manhattan institute, has an extra very worth pointing at the differences, but you're right. taxpayers a beginning to realize this monopoly power that unions have over government which is the new frontier for them what the final frontier is really causing a rift between the rank-and-file workers in the private sector who have to pay these taxes for increased government and the rank-and-file workers in the public sector that are enjoying these benefits. it can't go on, and that was the battle in wisconsin, part of the baatle in michigan. lou: you cited a 2010 study in which you talk about the population growth of the right to wor
and government regulations are damaging his and similar businesses. he says the president's policies to help the middle class are going to have the reverse effect. joining us is president and co-founder of american bar products, william marsh, good to have you here. >> good morning, thanks so much for having me. >> now, you manufacture steel bars, something that's used in various places, but what are the challenges that you face, trying to make a product in america? >> governor, i never miss a marketing opportunity. on my way in i can't help, but notice a lot of steel is mid in my company. steel that moves your lights and books and underneath the audience. >> i have paper out there. be careful out there audience. >> it's all made by companies like mine. our product is a qualities product. it's the same as sold in china and india. it's a big difference, the question is how does a company like mine compete in a global environment where china, india and europe are on our shore. >> they're having government subsidies to chinese products so they can put guys like you out of business and that's wh
." and the last sentence reads, "right to work breaks this cycle of government-aided monopoly union power from the larger economic good." is it hard to fight this kind of rhetoric? >> it's certainly tough. particularly when it's not accurate. what this does on a practical basis when you benefit by safe working conditions and higher wages and having your pension protected, you're no longer going to have to contribute to collective bargaining and the process that gives you the benefits. that's not fair. that's not the american way. it's a power grab unfortunately in the purest, most partisan sense and it's very disappointing to see my state in this situation. >> senator, they're going after democratic infrastructure. would you agree with that? this is how they want to win elections, they want to break your back. >> right now, in the face of citizens united, the courts have said unlimited, secret money can be given by corporations now. and on the other side, people that come together to collectively bargain to have a good way of life and be part of the middle class now are going to be able to hav
the infrastructure in syria in tact. by destroying the infrastructure the governance of that country we allow libya to slip into chaos. we not allow it to happen in syria. best course of action is for us to not do that sort of thing. encourage him to leave. have the russians help us. clearly we have got to maintain that country as a sovereign effective good country with governance in some form. >> we don't have enough time to go through the country. talk about the countries going to play a vital role in whether this is solved peacefully or a bad let's talk about iran. let's talk about russia and let's talk about egypt which one is the king pin in this whole mess? >> rush sharks -- russia, period for syria anyway. base where they have ships coming into. they vin influence over both countries as we know the russians have been helping the iranians. egypt not so much. egypt has its own problems. iranians we are already in their face so to speak. sanctions. issues with elm this. russia is the king pin here. they can do the most good and the most harm. frankly, now if the represents are used they will ho
to you. for four years after that, $182 billion buyback. the government offering more than $230 million in shares. the price represents a 2.6% discount. aig closed yesterday. it will raise $7.6 billion. in a statement, treasury's former chief reinstruct during officers jim millstien says no tax player should be pleased with the government had to rescue this company, but all taxpayers should be pleased with today's anounlsment ending the largest of the industry bailouts. but the way, that profit now looking to be about $15.2 billion and people did not expect that we would ever make money on in deal. i don't know if that makes the deal any better. i don't know if all of the anger and frustration that people have had, that people say, okay, we had a profit and we're okay with it. are you okay with it? >> i'm okay with it, yeah. i feel better. i know you haven't seen this movie, but "mr. smith on goes to washington." he said for so long -- >> where were you looking at on the screen? >> i was just reading it. i don't know. you guys of lost me on that last one. >> aig said et wasn't that inte
the government is simply making a peace savings. i do know seniors cannot save $5 billion without someone paying the price. melissa: thank you. be sure to watch the tom sullivan show this weekend. have all wonderful weekend. happy friday, everyone. we will see you back here on monday. ♪ gerri: tonight, did president obama break the law? some in the senate say yes, and now the cases in front of a judge. we will have a heated debate. with more than a million charities and the u.s. alone, how did you find the best one? we have you covered. "welcome to "the willis report." hello, everybody. i'm gerri willis. tonight no progress on the fiscal cliff as democrats and republicans trade barbs over the issue. one group of americans is finding a way through this regardless of congress and the president. small-business owners in this country are preparing to hire. join me now, chief u.s. economist for i may just pull one side. heart of america group founder, and member of the jobs creation alliance and actual job creators in this country who say their voices not being heard in this office took with debate
with this. this is all about, all about trying to preserve medicare. so the government in this case is unusually probably trying to do the right thing. i don't know everything about it yet because it is still a little furry around the edges. but aarp jumped on this. this is not good for members. the premiums. will go down. melissa: if it went through it could be good for the members in the sense that medigap premiums would go down. >> exactly. melissa: that is something their members would really like. but once again they would not. this is the big sticking point that happens again and again. >> right. melissa: you think aarp is out there because you're a senior lobbying in your best interest. meanwhile on their website, call your congressman, do this, do that e-mails. you could be following their lead and doing things actually against your best interest. >> yeah. the problem if you don't really pay attention to what they're doing they mask it so beautifully. they really do, a good job. i watch their commercials all day long. always sounds like they're advocating for their seniors.
" begins right now. >>> a government fractured, a market paralyzed, a call to action. as our nation careens to the fiscal cliff. cnbc's challenge to lawmakers to rise above partisan politics, seem compromise and find the solution. the clock is ticking down. the stakes are getting higher. now, we are turning up the pressure. this is a cnbc special report, "mission critical: rise above d.c." >> welcome back to our continuing coverage, mission critical: rise above d.c. we've been here all morning long. while we've been here on capitol hill, we've been talking to lawmakers about rising above gridlock and reaching a real deal on the fiscal cliff. in the last hour we sat down with grover norquist saying no one should strike a bad deal, and that there is no better reason to raise taxes now than there was in the past. he also added he thinks house speaker boehner has been a good leader during the fiscal cliff negotiations. and then we were joined by bob corker and bob conrad. corker said we need to focus more on entitlements now, and he will not sign any package that doesn't deal with entitlements
union anger at michigan's right to work legislation? this goes to the heart of government spending and the position of organized labor in president obama's second term. we're right there in michigan. let's go to facebook. weigh in on what's happening there. will detroit get a bailout and what do you think about the unions? will they win? good questions all. now, one of the worst blowouts in nfl history. seattle seahawks beat arizona cardinals 58-0. the cardinals threw four interceptions fumbled four times and gained 154 yards and seattle undefeated at home and then there's this. the new york giants scored only 52 points in the win over the new orleans saints. the star was the rookie and he returned the kick off for touchdown and all purpose yards and kept the giants in the lead. and major result for the economy. people having fewer babies, blaming the economy and one woman who took a chance and had six children anyway. we'll have that and of course the opening bell right after this. >> less than a minute to the opening bell. there's the news background that says that consumer spen
this scenario? the u.s. government using our tax money to build up an electric battery firm but after it fails the company sells out to a chinese outfit who takes advantage of our own taxpayer dollars. now producing for japan. there is something wrong with this picture. we'll have the details in a moment. please don't forget. free market capitalism is still the best path to prosperity. it may not entirely show itself in this fiscal cliff fix, but the fix may be coming. i'm kudlow. we'll be right back. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. >>> u.s. tax dollar funded battery marker a-123 systems is up for sale. the winning bid goes to -- china. so i asked was red china rising why u.s. taxpayers have to finance their battery companies. here's ann lee, author of "what the u.s. can learn from china," professor of nyu an
detroit bankrupt city government, too. this sure isn't the free market, and i asked why should a texas taxpayer bail out detroit? >>> breaking news from syria, and it is a blockbuster. the assad regime is walking and loading its chemical weapons, ready to use them on its own people. nbc's chief pentagon correspondent joins us now. jim, is this the red line president obama was warning about? >> well, not quite yet. u.s. officials tell us that the syrian military is poised to use chemical weapons against their own people, and all it would take really is the final order from syrian president assad. but we have learned that as of today, all the precursored chemicals for that deadly nerve gas have in fact now been loaded on to aerial bombs, but those bombs are still in the depots. they haven't been loaded on to airplanes yet, and president assad hasn't given the order. but they're pretty close, larry, and that's why earlier this week, of course, president obama issued a very strong statement aimed at president assad saying look, if you use these weapons against your people, there will be se
the problem with the deficit. >> era of big government is over. >> that famous declaration came toward the end of the first term where president clinton slashed the federal workforce by 14%. executive branch and created the department of homeland security and nearly 80,000 workers for a jump of 4.2%. despite the 7% increase over president obama's first term, the white house said he is committed to a leaner federal government in his second. but press secretary jay carney could only point to one fairly limited initiative to accomplish that. >> the president has put forward proposal to streamline and reorganize the variety of agencies that deal with commerce in the federal government. exports. >> the obama era in terms of the government hiring proved less kind to the states. from january 2009 through last month, according to bureau of labor statistics, the number of the state employees declineed by 120,000 or little over 2%. >> bret: thank you. up next. the president's defense secretary backs away from words about syria and chemical weapons. >> bret: the pentagon top man says syria appears to hav
to the federal government without raising tax rates which we believe am harm our economy. >> one conservative in the senate is breaking ranks with his party over the whole idea of raising tax rates with the party. tom coburn told msnbc today he would be okay with doing what the president wants, raising taxes on the wealthy, as long as it is coupled with entitlement reform and spending cuts. the reason we're told is because he believes at this point it's better to do that to get what he and other republicans want long term, which is a fundamental overhaul of the tax code, perhaps they can get that if they give the president what he wants now. you remember, coburn was among the first republicans a couple years ago to say it was okay to raise revenue. now he appears to be the first senate republican to say he would be okay with raising rates as long as it's part of that package we described. >> a meeting or a phone call between john boehner and president obama, is that at all in the works? >> as far as we know, no. whether it's in the works, we could only hope, at this point we do not have any i
going over the fiscal cliff. >> those three guys are here live. and the man who shut down the government under bill clinton. what newt gingrich thinks it will take to avoid that happening again. >>> plus one of my personal heroes, the fastest man in the history of planet earth. ja ma jamaican sprinter usain bolt revealing a talent you may not know he has. ♪ let's get together and feel all right ♪ >> this is "piers morgan tonight." >>> good evening. our big story tonight, you are so hot, america. i mean that literally. the temperature was a balmy 60 degrees this afternoon in new york just outside cnn's studios. the average high temperature in december is normally 43. a warm front has flooded the lower 48 states. quite extraordinary but is it evidence of man-made global warming? that's tonight's battleground america. joining me now, bill nye the science guy and mark morano, the publisher of climate depo.com. welcome to you both. let me start with you, mark, if i may. you are implacably opposed to the concept of man-made climate change. why? >> we followed the evidence. there are quite
reform debate, which may be apocryphal, "keep government hands off my medicare." the big tea party uprising was in large part a reaction to the idea, quote/unquote, of socialized medicine. it was the affordable care act, and the government, quote, takeover of health care, that fanned the flames of the post-obama tea party protest. but, of course, most of the actual republicans who were actually elected back then were elected because they ran ads like this. >> congressman brad ellsworth said he would protect our seniors. but when he got to washington, congressman ellsworth voted for the largest cuts in medicare history, over $500 billion. robin carnahan supports $500 billion in medicare cuts, hurting seniors most. rand paul doesn't support higher medicare deductibles for seniors. conway distracts with negative ads to hide his support for obama care, which cuts medicare by $500 billion. >> that was 2010. fast forward to this year's election and the same principle carries through. each side tried to convince voters that the other guy wanted to take the hatchet to medicare. >> the bigg
't explicitly opt into. >> i don't think government should interfere in the decision between working people and their employers. and there are lots of ways in which workers make the decision when they bargain their contracts and vote on their contracts about the rules of the road. and this is a situation where government is deciding to intervene in a labor management relationship in a system where labor laws are broken, they side with corporations and the wealthy. and it's why wages have remained stagnant for 30 years. and we have got to rebuild our power in the democracy and in our economy so we can lift wages for everybody, get this country back to work, and make service jobs jobs that people can raise their families on and expect that their kids are going to do better. >> do you think specifically in michigan there is an opportunity for appeal? >> i know that that is being considered, ezra. but here is what i think. i think the labor movement is going toe join hand with the community movement. we're going to organize like you've never seen before. we're going to assist the walmart worker
stimulating the economy without government interference. i think the thing to do is go right over the fiscal cliff. you'll raise some taxes, yes, that's true, you'll cut defense and some human services. this is the only way we'll have a significant bite out of this deficit. i think the market is going to like this. they say no right now, but when they see that this government is taking on the deficit in a serious way i think they will like it >> you don't think going over the cliff is armageddon? >> this is just nonsense, absolutely not. this is a bipartisan deal that was made. now both parties are trying to welch on their commitments. i think that's a mistake. >> steve, ben bernanke said today if we do go over the fiscal cliff, even if it's for a short period of time, it's going to be very costly and they do not have the tools to basically dig us out of it. do you believe if we go over the fiscal cliff it won't be as easy as the governor is suggesting? >> we're in trouble anyway this quarter and the next quarter and putting on taxes of any kind would be the wrong thing to do. sometimes the
work with governments to break the law, foreign governments with terrorists they threatened by their actions the lives of u.s. citizens. saying at one point, and this is a quote, he says i don't think anyone is alleging hsbc was the mastermind of many of these schemes. rather the compliance was so lax that it was allowed to happen. listen to what he said at the beginning of the conference about how hsbc helped governments rake the law. in his own words. >> on at least one occasion hsbc instructed a bank in iran how to format payment messages so that the transactions would not be blocked or rejected. by the united states. >> so hsbc, according to lanny brewer, actually told the governments in iran, the bank at iran, how to break u.s. law but they will not go after the individual's who might have shown the bank how to do it. we asked hsbc for the number of executives who have been subject to call back of the bonuses, the department of justice and hsbc have made a great deal, great fact of the number of executives who have had their bonuses clawed back. they refuse to give the
: the big question still what will the federal government do. pot still illegal federally burning here and soon in colorado. >> so miguel, you just mentioned that there could be this boom in tax revenue if they tax it at 25%. i don't understand how that will work because today you can't buy it, you can't sell it and you can't grow it legally. how can you tax it? >> reporter: that's the huge piece that needs to be worked out by the washington state bureau of liquor that's going to run all of this just like they regulate liquor sales, they're going to regulate marijuana sales. they're going to license and tax the growing, the processing and retail sales for all marijuana all at 25% plus fees for every individual that goes into those various businesses. they project that in the first five years nearly $2 billion from this program alone. >> and then this is not the only state because during this federal election there were two states that ended up on positive end of legalizing recreational marijuana. the other one being colorado. why do we not see a party there today? >> reporter: because
place in government. >> including at a federal level? >> including at the federal level. that's what elections are. collective bargaining. >> house democratic leader nancy pelosi pointed out jim demint was one of the ringleaders in voting down the u.n. treaty for people with disabilities this week. >> that was one of the saddest days, so anyone who was a party to that, well, i wish them well wherever they are going and hope that we can have more of our values represented there. >> it was demint and his tea party allies who pushed the country to the brink of default back in 2011. this is what demint told abc news about republicans who tried to strike a debt deal. >> what happens if -- what happens to republicans who go along with a debt ceiling increase? if they go along with the debt ceiling increase without a balanced budget amendment and the kind of stuff you're talking about? >> i think for the most part they're gone. it would be the most toxic vote we could take. >> demint's far right ideology is a key reason nothing gets done in this congress. house speaker john boehner is curre
to dangerous levels that might have required a government bailout. a lot of people weren't marking things where needed to go. >> i have a lot of questions about this story. it's an amazing allegation. $12 billion in paper losses. >> a lawyer from one of the whistle blowers will join us at 6:50. in a statement to cnbc, the bank says that allegations have already been investigated and all accounting was proper. >> my biggest questions are the allegations say the bank was doing it 2007 to 2010 and nobody came forward until late 2011 to make any complaints. i just wonder if you had been complaining the whole time along -- >> we just had this discussion about how far away do you need to be to where it's a false mark. at least 10% wiggle room. there were no buyers. if there is buyers, does that make it zero. >> basel 2 created a system that if things became less liquid, there is no change in the actual value of of the underlying asset. just couldn't sell it. so it's a bit like saying my house is a lesser asset because i can't accept it right now even though i don't want to sell it right now. >> who m
don't worry about it. >> i know the sourt korean government is alarmed about what is going on. even if the south korean troops go on a high alert, how does that impact the nearly 30,000 soldiers along the dmz? >> there are troops throughout the northern part of south korea and even further back into south korea. we are told always that they are at a high state of alert. the intelligence assets remain on station 24 hours a day because of the assumption that north korea could order its ground troops across the dmz or start firing some day with the long-range artillery. they could keep it in north korea and fire well into south korea. so all of this is the constant concern this missile test only raises it, wolf. >>> nato today confirmed the dangerous he is c dangerous escalation, another one, in syria civil war. they describe it as scud-type missiles inside syria this week. missiles aimed at civilian populations controlled by the rebels. let's go to our foreign affairs correspondent jill dougherty. what are you learning, jill? >> well, u.s. military satellites are tracking those missil
to believe a president or anyone else that later on the government is going to do this? i mean, does he think -- i mean, it's absurd. no american is going to trust that i'm here from the government and here to help you or don't worry, we're going to do this alert. >> it goes back to the basic premise i stated which i don't think the president really wants a deal. he's happy with the deal he's got, and unless the republicans. >> he has no deal. >> he does. he has the deal put in place over a year ago which is all the tax rates going back to where they are, and two big cuts, a big cut in defense and a big cut in domestic program. >> so he wants to go off the cliff. >> all right. he doesn't see it as a cliff. he sees it as a pretty good deal that they negotiated over a year ago that puts him in a position where he doesn't have to negotiate, that he can negotiate from a position of strength. >> but he has a slight other problem and that's at the end of december we're going to bump up against the debt ceiling and he wants that debt ceiling to go up. here's another thing he did which maybe you can
before or after the government goes over the so-called fiscal cliff. "new york times" columnist david brooks describes it this way. republicans will be raising middle class taxes in order to serve the rich. shafting sam's club to benefit the country club. if republicans do this, they might as well get mitt romney's 47% comments printed on t-shirts and wear them for the rest of their lives. so republicans have to realize they're going to have to cave on tax rates. the only question is what they get in return. michael steele is former chair of the republican national committee and an msnbc political analyst, and steve mcmahon's a democratic strategist. michael, you're on the republican side, and what do you think of that? the argument made by brooks which is more sophisticated. make your deal now while you can get something for it because after january 1st you will just be saving your rear end. >> i think he's absolutely right. i think part of that deal should include giving the president what everybody in this town agrees on, and that is those middle tax cuts for the middle class out o
have take an gun and put it at their head. i'm not the government of the united states. that is my point. >> greg: i hope the government would do the same thing if it was my family. that is my point. >> eric: that is the point. you are gaining information that would hopefully stop a terrorist attack that might kill thousands of people. >> bob: i thought it was c.i.a. that got the intelligence, not f.b.i. >> andrea: isn't in a movie? liberals say it's reprehensible. >> dana: right. so what dianne feinstein said, i know of the joint commission and the investigation in waterboarding. i know them very well. i would take the word of those people over hollywood depiction of it any day. a lot of people will see the movie. it's a good thing. but sometimes it's difficult to separate hollywood from the truth. in this case, sounds like the liberals are mad and there is a good reason for it. >> bob: where did you come up with the notion that liberals are against this whole thing? i haven't heard that. >> andrea: there is a bit of outrage. >> bob: so that's all liberals, right? >> andrea: "new
, john says, you have here before you, the american government in exile. >> by the time this interview is over, you will know why they both lost. >> what is known about the three of you is you're very close friends. i sort of represent an air or an essence of bipartisanship and genuine cross-party friendship, which many feel doesn't really exist in modern-day washington. how have you managed to do this? and why can't more of your colleagues do this? >> respect, affection, traveling together. when you travel together -- and by the way, other senators have described our travel as death marches. we go to exotic places like afghanistan and baghdad and libya and those really fun places. but i think traveling together is probably been for years now we've traveled to the most interesting places, maybe not the most fun places. and so we become friends that way. here in the senate. therefore, we have worked together on a lot of national security issues. lindsay is a reserve colonel in the air force. he serves his active duty for years in iraq, now afghanistan. joe being a key member of the home
officeholders like liberal officeholders have a real stake in making the government work. a far bigger question, will the war on the right help the country unite and avoid the fiscal cliff or will it give the right a chance to bring the house down. with me is ron reagan and dana milbank of the "washington post." before we talk about the gop split, we should republicans in the white house have exchanged horses. that's the thought i have. i may be conservative about this. >> yeah, i think you're right, they'd like to, but i'm not sure they can get it done before christmas, maybe before the end of the year. i think, again, as we get down to the last few hours, i think then you will see a real push to get something done. as dana implied, everybody knows in a sense what this agreement in broad strokes is going to look like. we're going to have tax increases on the upper 2% and we're not going to have a tax increase on the middle class. and there's going to be some spending cuts. but that's, you know, that's about all we know. >> let's take a look at this fight that seems to be emerging on the right.
sector 7%. >> you think overall, isn't it, 7%? more than 50% of those work for the government. >> 7% and more than that if you go up, like -- i think it's 16% if you include -- 13 if you include public, which is -- where it is. a contentious issue. they point to what happened in indiana. you know, more jobs, better -- better economy -- >> i think the -- >> the right-to-work states seem to be -- it seems to have been born out that it's better for the overall state. better for all the occupants in the state when you go to right-to-work. >> you got somebody in the white house who's a big friend of labor. and yet they are losing on the state level in a lot of places. >> and he named some comment -- made a comment. i can't remember how he characterized what right-to-work laws do. but it seemed like sort of an overstatement of what we're talking about. >> i guess the only other side is this old-fashioned collective choice view or free rider problem. if you want to pay dues, i get the benefits, i don't have to ride along. it's not like it's a completely one-sided argument. >> right. you kn
leadership and also, i'm someone who wants to govern and i can only govern if i make you understand that i'm not going to put up with it anymore. >> it seems like an outburst that has been two years in coming and is loaded with things like, we don't have control of the united states senate because of you, tea party people who have given us nuts as republican senate nominees. and boehner's life would be so much better if he was working with a republican senate instead of the democratic senate he is working with. >> yes. and also, though, i think this message is that the speaker, he wants to govern. the whole point of coming to washington is not just to slash, cut, close. it is about governing. and john boehner for whatever you think of him is someone that wants to get a deal. he wants to govern. by doing what he has done, he is saying, look. enough with the games. we don't have the senate as you were saying. the only way we can do this is if i pull on the reins a whole lot. not just a bit. that's what he's done. >> the striking thing is how much outrage there is not. we had to comb around t
. roughly 16% of aig shares. this is a mayjor coupe for the government. still at 33 bucks even though it's down after-hours up from the re-ipo after the financial crisis. >> and it's something that will make the ceo very, very happy. the last couple times he's been on this program, he has been campaigning publicly for the government to do just that. he wants them off his balance sheet and off his back. >> it was an unpopular risk to begin with. so brings this all into the era. >> as kayla pointed out, it turned out to be profitable for the country. >> absolutely. >>> in the meantime, death tax would jump. we talk about why it might cost someone's heirs a ton of money if their die on new year's day versus new year's eve. >> and later bmw and mercedes are running neck and neck for the best luxury maker in the country. phil lebeau has the huge deal story coming up. if you think running a restaurant is hard, try running four. fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our busines
government, according to this new report. >> shepard: jennifer griff fin at the pentagon. there's word that the syrian government may have already used chemical weapons on its own people. now, fox news can't confirm that, but the activists are reportedly saying they have the video to prove it. fox news can't verify the video, either. president obama has called the use of chemical weapons a red line for the united states, and he's warned there will be consequences if syria crosses that red line. let's get to kathry catherine he live in washington. what do we know about this video? i can't get confirmation from anyone. >> reporter: we're being told there's no independent evidence the syrian regime has used chemical weapons, but over the weekend video uploaded to the weapon claimed to show the use of chemical weapons by the assad government. this fire allegedly producing toxic smoke after tank was unloaded by a syrian jet over rebel-held territory. another video which could not be authenticated claimed to show protective er gear confiscated y opposition forgeses and the syrians continue t
government says it shows just how desperate assad's regime is now getting. >>> and also, our first look at the shooter who police believe is responsible for last night's deadly rampage in a portland-area mall. police have identified him as well as the two people that he killed. let's go "outfront." >>> good evening, everyone. i'm ashleigh banfield in for erin burnett tonight who is on assignment in afghanistan. we've got breaking news right off the top. cnn just learning that the united states does not believe that north korea is in full control of that satellite that it sent into space with the long-range rocket launch. this is according to a u.s. official to our barbara starr at the pentagon. up until now, by most accounts, this launch has been seen as a success, or certainly it raised the bar on how we view their capabilities. erin burnett spoke with defense secretary leon panetta, exclusively in kabul about this very issue. take a look. >> mr. secretary, thank you so much for taking the time. >> good to be with you, erin. >> i wanted to start by asking you about north korea. i know,
is right. this president needs to get off the campaign trail. the election is over. now it's time to govern. what's more important, what senator graham is talking about, the president has to start talk being spending cuts. we've already had two months of the new fiscal year. we're $292 billion in the deficit. there's some interesting numbers through there. revenues have increased $30 billion. they've gone up 10%. why that number is important is the president is able to raise the rates that he wants, he'll only collect $31 billion for the entire year, just on the rates. but the real problem is spending has gone up 16%, more than $87 billion. so we've got to start looking at, where are we going to cut spending? he wants to increase taxes to keep spending. we'll be in another mess, next year asking the same questions we're asking today. >> a tax increase only buys you a limited amount of time as long as the spending is more than that's coming in. why is he campaigning? he's not able to convince anyone on the republican side. i wonder, for all the reports you read about republicans being divide
. ♪ ♪ >>shepard: 12 seconds left. the dow today, they were all excited when they thought the government was baying up bonds and they realized it was no big deal so it is flat. (chanting). >> the battle for the future of the labor movement, michigan, a union stronghold, the birth inflation of the united autoworkers union, but transformed to the nation's 24th right-to-work state, limiting union power and the guy the unions call a "rat" the michigan governor is here. now. >> welcome, big news, i am neil cavuto, 24 hours after governor snyder signed the right-to-work legislation into law, sparking all of the angry protests, it looks like the battle is just going. leave us alone. or we are coming for you. we are done. >>neil: some unions are out for a lot more than their point of view be but for blood and they are not holding back. and neither are state lawmakers. >> we are going to pass something that will undo 100 years of labor relations. there will be blood. >>neil: everyone should cool that. but is the governor worried about what he unlived? the michigan governor snyder with me now. are you surpri
. adam: some people think investing sometimes is too good to be true. what is the government's (in nailing steve cohen? charlie: i do not think people are focused on the fiscal cliff. they will not be focused until you see the market sell off. the market believes there will be a deal. until the market trade-off -- adam: we have a guest who will be talking about that a little later on as we get closer to the end of the year. the investigation is still underway. charlie: when you see the market trade-off you watch people freak out. interesting thing about steve cohen, there is no more remarkable trader out there than this guy. say what you want to about him. if you look at his returns, i think he started in 92, one down here. he is up this year, so far, 10%. that is why the feds are after him. i have been speaking to a lot of people with the fpi. long-term returns, consistent and less volatility. what they do, generally, they look at returns, pretty much steady returns, not a lot of volatility. you look at steve collins return, one down year. you look at warren buffett. he destroys p
medicare, from 65 to 67. that would help the government save almost $6 billion a year, according to one study, though it would also come at a cost. an average of $700 more in out-of-pocket costs for those seniors no longer eligible for medicare, not to mention additional health care costs for employers. and, diane, you talked about the political cold front here in washington, d.c. how frosty are things? well, house speaker john boehner did come to the white house last night for president obama's annual holiday party for members of congress, but he did not get in the receiving line to say hello to the president and get a picture taken with him as he has done in previous years and as dozens, if not hundreds, of members of congress did last night. diane? >> okay, jake tapper reporting from the white house tonight. >>> and now we head overseas. take a look at the size of this protest today in cairo, egypt, tahrir square, tens of thousands of protesters reeling from tear gas but determined to send a message to the world about their new duel over democracy, and here's abc's alex marquardt. >>
so much, rich. >>> and now, we turn to our consumer watchdog. the government sounding the alarm tonight about something that affects millions of older americans. you may have seen commercials calling for a reverse mortgage. but tonight, abc news has learned there's growing concern and the government may be ready to take action. here's abc's senior national correspondent jim avila. >> it was just grand. this was our dream. >> reporter: the family home, dream and nest egg for wisconsin's linda and jim mcmahon. until it had to be sold out from under linda to pay back a reverse mortgage as soon as her husband died. >> i get a letter, sorry to hear about your husband passing away. buy the house or move out. >> reporter: reverse mortgages give homeowners an immediate cash payment in exchange for future equity. allowing them to stay in the house until death. but only people 62 and older qualify. linda was too young to be on the mortgage, so, when her older husband died, she lost everything. it's only one danger inherent in the reverse mortgage. >> hi, i'm fred thompson. >> hi, i'm henr
tonight rejected the constitution drawn up by the government, along with a referendum on it scheduled for next weekend. in doing so they also said no to a form of compromise offered by president mohammed morsi who late last night rescinded a decree giving him unlimited powers. morsi immediately issued a new decree that does much of the same thing with the figure of a totally new constitution within six months if the referendum rejects the present draft. the opposition is convicted morsi's muslim brotherhood wants to redraw the face of egypt. but the final goal isn't that clear according to khalid fahmy of the american university of cairo. >> they have an agenda of controlling all the institutions of the state. for what purpose, is significant to know. it is not necessarily to turn it into an islamic country. >> reporter: whatever the case the presidential palace is being turn mood a fortress under siege. barricades to keep protestors back have been reinforced which may be a good thing. the opposition called for nationwide protests on tuesday. morsi today ordered the military to mainta
leaders pocketing off of the workers and the undue influence and the rising cost of government. this is recognition that we have to get control over out-of-control governments. i think you were more accurate the first time. i idea here is that you have a free rider problem. when you have folks that are not paying union dues. kate's comment is right. it is a union breaking measure. some people see the unions as a free rider. picking the pockets of non union employees on union work sites. i think you should tell the president and vice president don't pick the american pockets so much. you know, i think republicans at the end of the day want to make a strategic move to extend the middle class tax cuts. but i think these huge revenue numbers which pick taxpayer pockets. don't go so far in that. taxpayers have limits. >> larry, i thought your position in that interview was right. i was thinking i'm glad larry is here in town comes down to my town to talk about economic growth. and we can have all kinds of arguments that you and i have had for years. but your position was right. we h
that went to congress not to limit government but to stop it. so what are you going to do? we have five democrats, five republicans that range from dick durbin from illinois and coburn of oklahoma, progressive conservative and five dems, five ren, one independent. that is a super majority. and for god sake, the reason we were so successful is that we effectively pissed off everybody in america. >> congratulations, sir. kudos. kudos to you. >> and there you go. alan simpson painting a bleak picture behind the scenes of the fiscal cliff negotiations. good morning. this is "way too early." thanks for being up with us this morning. we have a lot to get to on this thursday, december 6. >> including president obama actually making his appeal to business leaders on his tax plan. he's now reaching out following a very tough election campaign. >> and overseas, protests get violent in egypt where the once stable nation appears to be on the verge of crisis. first, let's get to the news live at 5:30 here at 30 rock in new york city. we begin with 25 days to go until the year end fiscal cliff deadli
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